Webinar: Conducting Culturally Competent Outreach and Enrollment (7/21/15)

Webinar: Conducting Culturally Competent Outreach and Enrollment (7/21/15)


>>Riley Greene
Okay. Thank you all so much for your patience there. I hate technical issues.
But they happen. So without further ado,
we’d love to get started. Thank you all for joining our
Connecting Kids to Coverage Webinar on Conducting
Culturally Competent Outreach and Enrollment. We have about 275 people signed
on right now and we had over 500 people sign up, so we know
that this is an in demand topic and I’m really excited for
the fantastic lineup of speakers that we have put together today. So I’m just going to run through
a couple of housekeeping items and then turn it over
to our lineup of experts to get going here. So just as you’ve done for your
feedback on the audio quality, which I very much appreciate,
we’re going to take questions through the chat box. That way you can write
your question in as you have it and we’ll collect those
questions and run through them at the end of the presentation. So again, to ask the question
use that control panel, that’s the grey box on the right
hand side of your screen. One quick note on our run
of show today. We had a change,
and unfortunately the Indian Health Care Resource Center of
Tulsa won’t be able to join us, but we hope to have them
on a future webinar. So stay tuned for
a great presentation from them in the future. To anticipate our most popular
question, I will say that a copy of the slides and a recording
of the webinar will be available on InsureKidsNow.gov
in about two weeks. And if you need or want a copy
for your team earlier than that, you can reach out to our webinar
organizer, Jenna Kelly, who you received the invitation
emails from, and she can follow up
with you directly. So without further ado,
I’m going to hand it over to Donna Cohen Ross,
the Director of Enrollment Initiatives at the Center
for Medicaid and CHIP Services to kick us off. Donna?>>Donna Cohen Ross
Thank you so much Riley, and thanks everyone for joining
us on a summer afternoon. We’re very happy to be hosting
this webinar today. It is a topic that we often get
a lot of questions about, and it is a topic that we know
we need the experts to guide us. So we’re very happy to have
those experts with us today. I’m going to give you a brief
overview of what we’re going to talk about today, and then
introduce our first speaker. So I think you can see
on your screen the agenda. We’re going to talk about using
culturally and linguistically appropriate services to increase
enrollment, I would add to conduct outreach
and increase enrollment. We’re going to hear about some
very specific enrollment lessons learned from our friends who are
working with Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific
Islander families. We’ll hear some broad
discussion, but also we’ll hear about some on the
ground outreach which I think will help us be very concrete. Later, we’ll have some,
our usual walkthrough of our Connecting Kids to Coverage
Campaign resources. And then we will go to some
questions and answers. I’m hoping that as you are
listening to our speakers you’re thinking about some of
the challenges that you may have in your own outreach work
in your own communities or in neighboring communities
doing what is best in terms of culturally and linguistically
appropriate outreach and enrollment. If you have questions,
if you have worries, if you have challenges,
I hope you’ll be thinking about those throughout
the presentation so that during our question and answer period
you’ll be able to voice those and get some guidance,
some advice, some answers, and help us
with our discussion. So without further ado,
it’s my pleasure once again to introduce my colleague here
at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services,
Cara James. Cara is the Director of the
Office of Minority Health, a great partner with us on
outreach and enrollment efforts. So welcome Cara,
we’re really eager to dive into the presentation. So take it away.>>Cara James
Thank you so much Donna, and good afternoon
to all of you. It is my pleasure to be here
today to talk to you about how you can use culturally
and linguistically appropriate services to increase your
outreach and enrollment to Medicaid and CHIP
eligible individuals. So on the next slide
we’re going to start with a little conversation about
culture and what it means. Because when we say culturally
and linguistically appropriate services,
it is best to begin the conversation
at the beginning. As you can see, culture
is composed of many things, and the way to think about this
is at the end of the day these are the things
that make us unique. They are also the things that
affect how we think about health coverage and the importance of
having it, and they are also the things that affect
our interactions with the health system. We want to take a holistic
approach to improve outreach to communities and help
to reach them as we enroll. On the next slide,
go through and think about how we can break down
different pieces of culture. It can be thought of
in many ways. So the social determinants
of health are this list of things that you see,
and these come from the World Health Organization
Social Determinants of Health Commission. There are a variety of things
such as the social gradient, where you are in
socioeconomic status. Early life, we talk about
prenatal care but not just prenatal care. It is also the safety and
security of your home, having access to healthy food
so that our children can grow up into healthy adults. Social exclusion, work,
unemployment, social support, addiction, food, stress,
transportation, the environment and the
community in which we live. And then we’ve also added health
insurance, English proficiency, and health literacy. And each one of these can have
an impact as you’re thinking about your outreach
to the community, what their health needs are,
what messages will reach these populations to help encourage
them to enroll in health coverage and make sure that
they are using coverage to take care of
the things they need. I’m going to go through just a couple of examples of what this looks
like within our population. And as you can see, the US
is a very diverse population. It is one where we have more
than 60 million people who speak a language other than
English at home, and more than 25 million
of those individuals speak English less than very well. As you can see, these are
the top ten languages among individuals who speak languages
other than English at home. What’s worth noting when
we are thinking about outreach to our Medicaid eligible
individuals is the population is much more diverse
at this stage than our Medicare population for example or than
the national statistics with many more individuals
who are Medicaid eligible speaking a language other
than English at home and being from different communities. On the next slide, it shows you the top ten languages again
but arrayed by the proportion of the population who speak
English less than very well. And it is worth noting
the huge variation that you see, where Vietnamese is the top
language where 60% of those individuals speak English
less than very well, and German at the bottom
with only 17%. It’s worth also noting that
when you think about this as a proxy for individuals
who may have immigrated here from other countries that
their health systems are very different
in many cases. Coverage and the need to have
coverage may not be something that they’re familiar with,
and it has an impact on your outreach strategies of how you
might engage with the community. And again some of those messages and thinking about the differences in the health
systems from which they come. On the next slide, one of the
things that we know is that many people speak English perfectly
well yet still struggle to understand basic health
coverage terms and to navigate the system. As you can see, we have at
the top the definition of what health literacy is. It is the ability of those
individuals to have the capacity to obtain, process,
and understand basic health information and services
needed to make appropriate health decisions. You think about the enrollment
process for coverage, the terminology and interesting
pieces that they may struggle to understand, as well as the
benefits that are now available to them through coverage. And ultimately, it can also
impact their ability to navigate the system to get
the care that they need. So one trick is to make sure
that as you’re producing materials, that you do those at
the lowest health literacy level possible, typically we think
the fifth grade level or sometimes
the eighth grade level. This also affects how this
relates to your work of reaching the uninsured and helping
them to get enrolled. And so as we look at how all of
these come together and who the uninsured are, you can see
that they are a very diverse group of individuals. But many of them we know,
1 in 2 has an income below 200% of the federal
poverty level. 1 in 5 has not finished
high school. Half of them identify as
a racial or ethnic minority. 1 in 4 were born
outside of the US. 1 in 5 have limited
English proficiency. Half of the uninsured adults
lack a usual source of care. 2 in 5 have had no health care
visits in the past year. And half are likely uninsured
for more than 12 months. So this is a population
that again in terms of their connections to health care may
not be as familiar with coverage and utilization and
how to engage in the enrollment process or understand
the benefit of signing up for coverage given how
they may have been utilizing the health care
system currently. So what can you do? And one of things that we talk
about is providing culturally and linguistically appropriate
services in your outreach strategies and throughout
the enrollment process. And as you can see
the definition includes the integration not just of
the knowledge of individuals but standards and practices
and attitudes into the services that are provided. One way to think about this is,
cultural competency is a process of viewing this throughout
the organization, not just from the outreach
strategies but also to the policies and questions
we are looking at and practices we put in place. On the next slide,
we look at what it means to provide
linguistic competence. And as you can see
the definition here, what I want to highlight
is that we think about linguistic competence for those individuals
with limited English proficiency, but as you can see
it is more than that. It’s also working with those
individuals with low health literacy and people with
disabilities and thinking about alternative formats. At the end of the day,
it’s making sure that we’re communicating effectively
to our audiences and that they understand our messages,
something that is critically important in the outreach and
enrollment process so that consumers can understand
what they are signing up for. On the next slide,
I want to briefly go through these next few slides. The National CLAS Standards that
we have to help you understand how you might go about providing
culturally and linguistically appropriate services. These standards are grouped
into four categories. The first Principal Standard
as you can see ultimately is looking to provide effective,
equitable, understandable and respectful quality care
and services that are responsive to diverse cultural health
beliefs and practices, preferred languages, health literacy and
other communication needs. The next three standards
are grouped into Governance, Leadership and Workforce. As you can see,
two of the standards are listed here but it covers Standards 2-4,
and they focus on the workforce that is
providing those services and your organization
is structured. On the next slide,
when we look at Standards 5-8, they are grouped into
Communication and Language Assistance. It really focuses on how to
provide high quality linguistic services to those individuals
with a variety of needs. Again, not just focused on those
with limited English proficiency but including literacy
levels and individuals with disabilities. On the next slide you see
Standards 9-15 focus on Engagement, Continuous
Improvement and Accountability. Some of those standards
are reflected here. They look at collecting
the data and understanding who the communities are that
we’re serving and the impact of our activities as well as
partnering with the community to continue our efforts. So those very quick snapshots of
the 15 National CLAS Standards, and I’ll talk about where you
can find out more information. But I want to just take a moment
to talk about what this means for you in your outreach
and engagement strategies and how you can use these
to help increase enrollment. And the first thing I want to
note is that although there are 15 standards, you don’t have to
think about doing everything. You can start with something
in one of those buckets to focus on how you can begin to provide
culturally and linguistically appropriate services or
to expand your capabilities for those who are
already doing this. One thing to think about
is you can have cultural competency champions throughout
the organization. You can collaborate with
businesses, schools and other stakeholders to learn about
the community and to share information,
I know that many of you are already doing this,
and thinking about branching out to some of the other partners
who you may not be engaged with who may have strong ties to
populations of interest that you are interested in working with
to increase enrollment. Another is to hold trainings on
how to address the needs of the population, and again
this is a great way to partner, to bring in those who have that
on the ground perspective and are the trusted sources
in the community, to share those lessons
with you and your colleagues. To identify the language
preferences of the customers and to provide multiple forms
of language services. You can make sure that staff
are fully aware of and trained in the use of language
assistance services, policies and procedures. And collecting demographic data
and using that data to guide plan development
and monitor implementation. We know there is data available
on where the uninsured are and detailing who they are
and understanding how we can reach them better
to increase enrollment. And finally, gather feedback on
the quality of the services from the customers. Do you remember those last
set of standards were about improvement and accountability
and how do we do a better job serving the populations
we are trying to reach. That will help to increase the
community outreach as well as increase enrollment numbers. So I want to close out by
sharing an example of how we have engaged in the provision
of culturally and linguistically appropriate services
and some of the lessons that we learned from that. And that is through an effort
we have which is called From Coverage to Care,
and it is designed to help the newly insured understand
their coverage and be able to connect
to the care that they need. We have a number of resources
that we’ve developed here as you can see and
they’re all available. But one of the things that
we wanted to make sure in designing this was that
it was at accessible levels. So we worked with pilots,
with community partners, to review the document
in English. We heard lots of feedback
about making sure that we lowered the literacy level to
make it more understandable. We also heard a desire
to pull out additional tools, that for some consumers,
the booklet was too much to handle in one fell swoop. So we made consumer tools like
the insurance card example, the primary care
and emergency care, smaller steps that could be
more digestible for a broader
array of consumers. One of the other things that
we knew we wanted to do based on the earlier slice that we showed
was to translate the road map into additional languages. So one of the questions that
we started with was which languages should we choose,
and how do we ensure that we have a high quality product? We picked our languages based
on data, again the importance of having that data,
from the call center that we received in terms of requests
for other languages and also looking at the data I showed you
earlier about the top ten languages spoken other than
English at home with those with the highest proportions of
individuals with limited English proficiency. And then as we thought
about how do we ensure a high quality product,
we turned to one of our partners who you’re going to hear
from next to reach to the community to make sure that
they reviewed the document both as it was translated and as it
was graphically laid out to ensure that the translations
were culturally appropriate and that we had a product that would
be useful in the community. We are extremely grateful
for the help the Asian Pacific Islander American Health Forum
did in connecting us with communities to review both,
I shouldn’t say both, but the Chinese, the Vietnamese
and the Korean translations. We also worked with partners for
each of the other languages and we worked with our Tribal
Affairs Outreach and Enrollment Group to ensure that our version
that we had for tribal communities spoke to them and
was culturally appropriate. So I think in terms of lessons
learned, just closing out, that we had a number of lessons
that working with the community is a very good thing to do
if you can do that. It takes more time than
you probably think, so you want to make sure
you buffer that in. And that because of the time
that it takes to ensure the high quality product, to make sure
that you buffer in as well an ability to both acknowledge
the community for their efforts and also to reimburse them,
because it is their time as well that they have invested
in this process. But absolutely I encourage you
to work with the community and to find those partners
who can review the documents to make sure that
they will have that reach. And again, we are incredibly
grateful for each of our partners who reviewed that. Finally, I just wanted to share
some resources where you can learn more about how you can
incorporate culturally and linguistically appropriate
services into your organization and things you can do. As you can see, there are some
resources for providing effective communication
and language assistance, resources for the marketplace,
as well as resources from the National Disability Navigator
Resource Collaborative. So again, I thank you for
the opportunity to present and I look forward
to the discussion.>>Donna Cohen Ross
Great, thanks you so much Cara. That’s a lot for us to digest,
but I know that as we’re listening we will be
thinking back to some of those high level ideas that you shared
with us, and I think we’ll have some good questions when
we get to our question and answer period, so thank you. Next I am going to introduce
the person that Cara was alluding to a moment ago, another great partner. I want to welcome Bonnie Kwon,
who is the ACA Program Manager for the Asian and Pacific
Islander American Health Forum. She is also going to talk, maybe
with a little more specificity, but also with some broad strokes
about this topic, leading into a very specific presentation
from one of her colleagues in the field. So Bonnie, it is your turn
and we welcome you.>>Bonnie Kwon
Thanks so much Donna. Can everyone hear me?>>Donna Cohen Ross
You sound great.>>Bonnie Kwon
All right, thanks. So thank you again
and good afternoon everyone. I am the Program Manager,
the ACA Program Manager at the Asian and Pacific Islander
American Health Forum. We’re an organization that
influences policy, mobilizes communities and strengthens
programs and organizations to improve the health
of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians
and Pacific Islanders. We work with a network of
community based organizations across the country. I want to turn sharing
a little bit with you about the activities that we had with our
community partners for the ACA. We came together with
four altogether national partners including ourselves
with AAPCHO, the Association of Asian Pacific Community
Health Organizations, and two affiliates of the Asian
Americans Advancing Justice Network,
AAJC in DC and Advancing Justice LA
in Los Angeles, along with over 70 community
based organizations and community health centers
to coordinate and really leverage resources for
conducting ACA outreach, education and enrollment
in AA and NHPI communities. So we, all of the organizations,
in particular our community health centers and community
based organizations, have deep experience with
reaching diverse and hard to reach communities
through culturally sensitive and linguistically
appropriate services. We really wanted to make sure
that the coordinated effort was going to maximize
the reach that we had to Asian and NHPI communities. On the next slide,
you’ll see that there are dozens of different languages spoken
in the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and
Pacific Islander group. Actually, I think my slides
are a little bit different than the ones that are loaded. But maybe we can find
the demographic profile slide. Going over the first open
enrollment, we know that there were an estimated 1.9 million
uninsured AA and NHPIs. And we were very aware
as I said earlier that there were dozens
of languages spoken and language was going to be
a significant barrier. In addition to language,
we knew that 60% of Asian Americans are foreign-born,
so there would be concerns related to immigration status,
fear of enrolling in a government program
if you are a member of a mixed status family or even for those
who were immigrants and were anticipating at some point
filing paperwork for citizenship that based on the different
histories that communities have they fear that they may later on
suffer negative consequences as a result of having
accessed government services. Being aware of language access
and immigration status is one of the two greatest barriers. We’ve built an outreach,
education and enrollment strategy along five pillars. The five pillars were
outreach and education, eligibility and enrollment,
monitoring and enforcement because we wanted to ensure
that consumers were having meaningful access
to the marketplace. Developing resources,
both financial resources to do the work but also
innovating and increasing intellectual resources
and expertise of our in-person assisters
in the network. And then finally we wanted to,
we made very intentional building service capacity
for limited English proficient consumers since
that was a barrier. Since open enrollment one
in fall of 2013, Action for Health Justice
collectively over 22 states has been able to touch nearly
850,000 individuals through outreach and engagement
with events, health visits, one on one sessions,
presentations, workshops. And very importantly,
the assistance that was offered was in 56 languages, and
the reach really was maximized through over 500 partnerships. So that’s a little bit about
what we’ve been able to do with our partners. But I want to turn now to a few
lessons learned that have emerged through the first and
second open enrollments. The first is engaging AA
and NHPI consumers. As community champions and
really trusted messengers of their communities, our partners,
our CBO partners, engaged hard to reach consumers
through strategic and very innovative methods that
address language, cultural, socioeconomic, and
health literacy barriers. Really altogether,
we say these efforts worked to promote a culture
of coverage. This is accomplished through
working in the community. HJ partners had
a strategy to go where the community lives, works,
plays, worships, and shops. HJ partners disseminated
information through a variety of different venues and events
that already existed as hubs of information and were
social gathering places. Some of the places that folks
presented at were temples, mosques, churches, alongside
faith leaders who were trusted messengers in the community. They also engaged in
partnerships with small businesses like
ethnic groceries. We found that the majority
of the community that we worked with, the ethnic
grocery was a really effective bulletin board
and an information dissemination center. We also partnered with public
and government officials where they had existing relationships
with the community. And finally, in reaching
consumers where they were at, there were very effective
partnerships with ethnic media also. They also opened
enrollment store fronts. One of the examples that comes
to mind is that we have a partner in Minnesota that
rented a space at a Hmong flea market that houses over
200 vendors and really attracts Southeast Asian consumers from
the entire state of Minnesota. They provided one on one
enrollment assistance and also more general education sessions
at the free market. Finally, in engaging consumers
it was really important to continue to develop
trust throughout. So our partners addressed
misconceptions and in particular immigration status concerns,
really beginning from a place of validating consumers’ concerns,
one on one education to dispel myths,
and recognizing that it was going to take time to build trust
for the marketplace through multiple encounters
but always being ready with consistent easy
to understand
information. And in particular for
immigration related concerns, our partners did the work of
bridging the information that came out early in round one
of the open enrollment about, there was an ICE memo that came
out to clarify that there would be no negative immigration
repercussions for mixed status families who applied on behalf
of eligible family members. So our in-person assisters
filled that gap to do that education and therefore create
that culture of trust that was needed for folks to enroll. They also engaged in strategies
such as opening official mail with family members who had
a history of mistrusting and fearing communications coming
from government agencies. The second area of lessons
learned was the effectiveness of in-person, in-language
consumer assistance. This meant direct engagement
in one on one encounters beginning with education
that was offered. If education was offered
in larger settings or even small groups,
there was either simultaneous interpretation or
offered in-language. On the slide before you,
you will see a picture of one of our partners at SEAMAAC
in Philadelphia providing enrollment assistance to a
mother and her young child. This is an example of the kind
of community partner we have. They have over 30 years of
experience working in the community, serving refugees,
immigrants and asylees. So they are really looked to
as a trusted source of information,
and that relationship has continued based on the intention
they have put into building a staff of over 42 people with
over 50% immigrants and 80% being bi- or multilingual. So with staff working in
a trusted organization that are knowledgeable and meeting
the consumer where they are at in terms of language and
enrollment process does then create that trust and cultural
sensitivity to where the consumer may be coming from. You’ll see on the next slide,
sorry, on this slide you’ll see, I’m not sure if this is
a complete list of the 56 languages but this is
a snapshot of the languages that the in-person
assistance was provided in. And the next slide you’ll see
that another area of lessons learned was really the value
of providing high quality translated resources. This is a snapshot of
the Action for Health Justice Health Insurance
Enrollment Glossary. This glossary is a combination
of over 100 terms that our CBO partners identified as important
for the enrollment process. It is soon to be released
in a full 13 languages. We have 10 currently released … [ automated announcement ]
Muted.>>Riley Greene
Hi Bonnie, we can hear you, go ahead.>>Bonnie Kwon
Okay, sorry. Going back to something
that Dr. James touched on. This resource was created with
community feedback and input and multiple updates and revisions
so that it would actually resonate that the terms were
contextual and not just literal translations. On the next slide you’ll see
that there was really a three pronged strategy when looking
at quality translated resources. We wanted, community partners
identified that they need to be simple, straightforward language
for people with lower literacy or education levels
to understand, that there should be
a very limited number of messages so that the messages
that are being carried forth are the key concepts to grasp. And then finally that
like everyone else, that pictures make it much
easier to understand concepts and also to resonate. One of the things that often
were overlooked in general outreach was that if you were
providing an outreach flyer and a picture of a community member,
that that community member should in some way look and
feel, the setting should feel like the target community. So finally I wanted to bring
the lesson learned that the experience that our Action for
Health Justice partners had with championing the voices of AA
and NHPI communities. Because this was and continues
to be the marketplace, they continue to be new programs
for many communities. And as we go through subsequent
open enrollment periods, we are needing to reach deeper
and deeper to reach the harder and harder to reach. The importance of championing
the voices, collecting the stories, and
elevating the stories so that there is a notion and a feeling
of this being a shared experience. And that really goes back to one
of the earlier barriers that I mentioned about fearing
and mistrust of the ACA and sharing stories folks feel
they can identify with and maybe they share similar
barriers and can gain added confidence to enrollment. In championing the voices,
I say it was also important to take the stories of both
the challenges and successes back to government agencies
to share where there were areas to concentrate on
to make improvements and update the system. So today, we’re in the summer
lull before gearing up for open enrollment three. We’re continuing the work with
our partners in three areas. We continue to support in-person
assistance and navigation through sharing resources
and coordinating efforts and collaborations
and partnerships. We’re focusing and looking at,
how are we going to reach the harder to reach that haven’t
already received the message and information about
the Affordable Care Act? And then as folks are becoming
newly insured, how are we helping people
keep and use their coverage? I think the resource that
Dr. James shared at the end of her presentation is one
resource that we have been very happy to collaborate with. However, we want to look at what
else there is and what we can do to support our CBO partners. You can here see a list of
a few of the publications that we have released
along with the web address where you will find it. I want to just say thank you
and I really look forward to hearing from the participants
on the webinar this afternoon.>>Donna Cohen Ross
Bonnie, thank you. That was a really
tremendous presentation. I know that it was the second
time that I heard it and I really learned a lot just by
listening to not only your words but thinking through some of
the examples you gave. I think one of the things that
really resonated with me was something you said
a little while ago. You talked about what
application assisters, the value of having them
validate the concerns that consumers have,
but also your next sentence or a few sentences later was about
giving them information that might help allay their fears. And it seems to me that
it’s that balance that we’re striving for. So I thought your example
was a really good one. I guess others will know that
we also have seen great, just a great way of working with
local communities by working with community businesses. Grocery stores have
really been very helpful, and you talked
a little bit about that. As you may know, we have one of
our outreach videos from Texas that looks at conducting
outreach and enrollment at a site which happens to be
an ethnic grocery store and talking with some of
the families that have gotten help there you can understand
why it just feels like enrollment is part of
the community. So I thank you for that
example as well. So I want to introduce
our next speaker, who I think is going
to get even more on the ground. And that is Zeenat Hasan
who is the Director of Empowerment and Advocacy
at the Asian Pacific Community in Action organization. She is going to tell you
a little bit about her organization,
where she is located, and the work that she is doing. So welcome.>>Zeenat Hasan
Thank you Donna and thank you to Bonnie and Cara for both
setting this up so well. My name is Zeenat Hasan,
and I’m the Director of Empowerment and Advocacy at
a community based organization in Phoenix, Arizona called Asian
Pacific Community in Action. We were founded in 2002, initially to address Hepatitis B concerns in the Asian American
community. We have been around since then,
and we serve mainly Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians,
Pacific Islanders and other emerging
refugee communities. We do many things like health
education outreach, we do enrollment assistance
on Medicaid and marketplace, and we also do advocacy work. So we do advocate
for language rights, for cultural competency
with our local community health centers and partners and
we work with local policies as well as national policies
to ensure that the voices of our community are part
of our political landscape. Our staff, we do have
some full time staff. We have part time outreach
staff, but more importantly we have community volunteers
and student volunteers. And of course,
during open enrollment period we would have up to maybe
25 to 30 volunteers doing various things around
enrollment for Medicaid as well as marketplace. Not everybody who comes to us
has been trained as a certified application counselor or
navigator or do enrollment work, but they do all play a critical
role in doing outreach events like setting up events,
engaging key stakeholders in the community, and ensuring
participation at some of these outreach events that
we put on ourselves. We also have a medical
interpretation program, so we try to cross train
individuals as interpreters as well as application
counselors who can work with Medicaid
and marketplace applications. Arizona does no longer have
a Children’s Health Insurance Program, that ended in 2012,
and about 40,000 kids were uninsured at that point. Many of them moved onto
Medicaid, and others that were not eligible
for Medicaid were supposed to be enrolled in healthcare.gov
in the marketplace insurance. We don’t necessarily know
whether all those children were enrolled in a plan,
but those who qualify for Medicaid were. Subsequently, a group called
Children’s Action Alliance, a local advocacy group
that has multiple service partners and engaged with them. They do advocacy work and also
ensure that all the partners working are able to conduct
appropriate outreach and enrollment services
for Medicaid in the state. Our enrollment numbers. During first and second
enrollment period these last couple of years, we enrolled about
1,100 children, and most of them came to us as part of families
that were coming to us, and really, it was interesting,
it transformed our office. We had children running around,
we had to have things to play with and distract while parents
were in appointments. It was something that
we hadn’t quite seen before at our offices. We have been busiest during
open enrollment periods, but we qualify about half of all
our enrollees in Medicaid. So even though we do Medicaid
enrollment all year round, this told us that families
were not aware of the benefits that they qualify for or really
how to access them without our assistance. So even though the first and
second enrollment periods, the first enrollment period
we were qualifying over 65% of people for Medicaid
insurance and not even marketplace insurance. And that told us quite a bit
about what people knew in the community and what they
knew they were eligible for. One of the absolutely most
important aspects of our work are the volunteers
that we engage. Volunteers are crucial
to our efforts in reaching the community that we serve. It wouldn’t be possible without
the people from the community who have a vested interest
in their friends and their families having good
health care coverage. They are in fact the foundation
of all the work that we do in Asian American,
Pacific Islander, and Native Hawaiian communities. Really building relationships
in the community, it’s a long term effort. It’s something we’ve done
since the founding of the organization. And building those relationships
with individuals, with stakeholders, with other
organizations that work in the community is something
that we do day in and day out. And it is also our primary way
of recruiting volunteers. So when we are trying to provide
culturally and linguistically appropriate services,
it is the volunteers that work with us and alongside us
that actually are the bridges to the community that we serve. And by having these
relationships in community and knowing people in the community,
we get to know about, you know, young people who are waiting to
go to graduate school and maybe have time to volunteer for us. Or retirees, or others
looking for part time work. And those are really
the ideal volunteers, right? And they come to us ready
to really serve, and we are able to equip them
with the information, with the knowledge,
with the tools that they need to do the type of work
that our communities require. We rely on bilingual volunteers
to conduct outreach at community events and who could recruit
other volunteers during these events. They can talk about their
experiences as volunteers and help others think about
becoming a volunteer in whatever capacity
they can do. Here in this picture
you see two of our volunteers. They are also certified
application counselors and also do Medicaid enrollment. They were at the Lunar New Year
festival spreading the word about Medicaid and our
Kids Health Link program. It’s important for us
to calendar all of the Asian American and Pacific Islander
festivals during the year. These some of the most important
periods where we can touch the most number
of community members. So the Lunar New Year
is a huge event. Chinese Week is another
huge event, the Aloha Festival, Matsuri Festival, the Autumn Moon
Festival actually in Fall. Various festivals,
you should be able to find them in local newspapers or
especially in ethnic newspapers as to when they are. But we always have a calendar
of these events as one of the ways that we can reach
the most number of people. And secondly, it is through
our volunteers’ relationship to the community, we are able
to work more closely with Asian American and Pacific Islander
restaurants and businesses. And we find they are very
willing partners in various aspects of outreach, and I’ll discuss
that in a moment. They allow us to use their space
and they are supportive of us putting flyers and reaching
the community that they serve as well. And I think, really
my point is that volunteers are an investment. They provide just that
critical link to communities. They speak the language,
they are part of the community that we are serving. And so stipending volunteers is
actually critical to recruiting volunteers and keeping them. And what we have been able to do
is to provide just nominal stipends, not much at all,
but we also reimburse volunteers for mileage. Phoenix is a large area,
it covers something like 9,000 square miles. So mileage reimbursement
became really important. Nonetheless, they were there
to do the work and not necessarily for the stipend,
it was very nominal as I said. But retaining volunteers
is another thing. You can recruit, recruit,
recruit, but how many of them will actually stick through it
through open enrollment or as many months
as you need them to work? What we ended up doing was
creating teams of volunteers that worked in specific
language communities. And these teams are mutually
supportive, so not everybody on a team of maybe three to five
to seven people, not everybody would
be doing enrollment work. Some would be better
at organizing events, some would be better at
recruiting participants for events. Some would be able
to do enrollment work. Many of them or all of them
should be able to do eligibility work and help people understand
what they are eligible for. Usually each team had a team
lead that would be the main liaison with the organization. Again, we stipended
the volunteers, everybody that worked. I believe that the CACs,
the people who enrolled folks in the programs received a higher
stipend than others that were doing more of the recruitment
and participation at events. But it was also important that
volunteers were working in their communities, so that
the places that they worked and did outreach were consistent and
that the places were familiar. So we would have folks that
would set up at an apartment complex for example where
we knew that a high number of refugees lived or a high
number of Somali refugees or Bhutanese refugees lived. And they would be there
on the same day once or twice a week every week and provide
eligibility resources, help people understand
what they were eligible for and also be able to enroll
people at those places. But it was important that
it was consistent, and these were places that
were familiar to communities. Transportation is always
a large issue in reaching the community that
we work with. So it wouldn’t be appropriate
to just have appointments at our offices or
at one central location. Our communities are spread
out all over the place. And in Phoenix we don’t have
anything like an Asian Town or a Chinatown or Korea Town
or Little Korea or Little Japan or anything like that. People are really dispersed
throughout the community, like I said it’s
9,000 square miles. We very much rely on being
in places where people are, at community events. And many of the volunteers
will know of community events that weren’t even on our radar. So they would know when
the Bhutanese community was having a celebration. And it’s very interesting
that in a community like the Bhutanese community,
there may be 2,000 people at that community, but gosh,
when they have events everybody comes out. An example of that is when
they were electing a president for the local Bhutanese
organization, everybody in the community
cast a vote for the president. I thought that was just an
incredible show of organizing. So there is a lot of
organization that happens within these communities that
we really only get to know of through the volunteers that come
to us from the communities. As well, volunteers
act as advocates. They know the stories of
the communities and helped us be better advocates for them, for
the people that we were serving. And of course, retaining
volunteers through appreciation. It’s very important that
we were recognizing the volunteers that worked
with us on an ongoing basis. Here we were giving away
t-shirts that said Turn Up the Volume. And people wore them really
proudly, I was very impressed that our volunteer corps
wore these t-shirts. We gave them basketball tickets,
things like that that we could get our hands on. We didn’t have the funding
to pay them like the workforce that they are and they
absolutely deserved to be paid. But we compensated them
in other was and we showed them appreciation in other ways. And I think that that for us
was critical in retaining a lot of our volunteers. So our strategy really
for reaching many of the communities. Ethnic media is powerful. Because from our previous work
and some assessments we did in the community, it shows us
that a really high proportion of those we were trying to reach
do get their information from ethnic media sources. That includes newspapers
and radio. What we did in the photograph
that you see is we held a media luncheon where we invited all
the ethnic media partners in the area and invited them
to a restaurant, had a luncheon, talked to them about
what our upcoming work was. And it was really good to get
their buy in so that they know us and so we could know them. Some of our media partners,
they would have different people working for them
at different times, and some of them had
consistent reporters, the photographers throughout
the number of years that we have been working with them. So it became more
of an alliance in a way because often they were
looking for local content, and we were looking
for media outlets. So if we would submit an article
about the work we were doing, we could also rely on them
to help translate the articles into the appropriate language. That was a very important way
of getting the word out, especially if we weren’t able
to buy ads at the moment at least we could
slip in an article. It was important for us
to also buy ads because we were supporting
their business and it would also show them that it was
a reciprocal event or a reciprocal
relationship rather. So we continued to invite them
to events, and inevitably many of them would show up every time
and cover our stories and write a short article or whatnot
in the newspapers or talk about our events on the radio. However, what we did learn
is that word of mouth rules. Greater than 70% of the people
who came to us came to us through word of mouth. They heard it from somebody else
in their family or community, and often it was attached
to a specific volunteer who had helped somebody enroll. So we would hear, I heard
this person helped this person, that’s why I’m calling. But much of the work was done
before we deployed the on the ground volunteers,
and that was really to do a media blitz. So we had to make sure that
we were covering the newspapers, the radios, the ads,
every which way that we could to spread the information
about who is eligible, what are you eligible for,
why is it necessary to have health insurance. And just to kind of talk about
health insurance as this need that we all have,
and more recently as this requirement
that we all have. And to let people know
where they could get help. We were able to do this
in multiple languages throughout different communities. For small communities…
let me step back a second. The Vietnamese community
for example, they have multiple media sources, including radio,
magazines and newspapers. And so we were really able
to do a real media blitz of multiple media resources. However, for smaller communities
that are less resourced like the Somali, Bhutanese,
or Burmese communities, it is important to place
volunteers at a strategic location on a consistent basis
like we talked about earlier, where they can talk to families
one on one about eligibility and actually conduct enrollment. These were places like apartment
complexes where refugees lived. But we also took advantage
of working with local businesses and restaurants. So a number of the outreach
events were working with Asian restaurants where we would have
a luncheon, invite people. And usually we had 35, 50, 70
people at one of these events. And we would do an actual
presentation, talk about the importance of having
health insurance, talk about eligibility, because
people really wanted to know, they wanted to know right then
if they were eligible for something because they didn’t
want to waste their time. So when were able to actually
put all that information out there, the last piece was
deploying the volunteer corps. And these volunteers,
we trained them to be knowledgeable about
the eligibility process, about the application process,
and they were able to talk about these at any events that
they attended, whether they were at apartments,
whether they were at festivals, or whether they were doing
an event at a restaurant. And once they did this,
families were able to subsequently follow up
with these volunteers themselves for appointments, or in some
cases we could enroll them right then and there if we had it set
up for enrollments at the time. Every volunteer
was very well equipped. All of those who were doing
enrollment work, they had information packets to
hand out to people in-language. They knew the procedures
for determining eligibility and enrolling people. They had mobile scanners,
they had laptops and they had cell phones that
they could use as hotspots. We needed to have access
to internet and we weren’t sure where we would be or if there was
going to be internet access, so we had to have cell phones
that had hotspots on them. So we were sending out people who
were very knowledgeable about the process and
were well equipped. That was really key too. Also gaining the trust of
the community, that we were people
who were able to do things and get them the services
that they need. Following that, we had a system
where we actually scheduled appointments for people,
so people weren’t coming and just waiting in line. We had packets that we gave out
to people that had all the information about what
they were supposed to bring to the appointment, and some of
those packets we got from the Children’s Action Alliance
and the Kids Health Link program that we were part of, which was
basically a large envelope which they could keep their
documents in, and on the outside of the envelope
it had specifically what documents they needed
to bring to the appointment. We would translate
that as appropriate. We would set up appointments
for double the time if we were working with somebody
in a different language. All of the information has
to be entered in English, so we had to do a lot of sight
translation, and sometimes the in-language visits
just took more time. So we would schedule two hours
for an in-language visit for example rather than an hour or so
for an English language visit. We rarely had people waiting,
we always scheduled. Sometimes they were scheduled
a couple of weeks out but I think that was
the longest people had to wait. But often also,
we had multiple visits with them. So they submitted an application,
they might receive correspondence in English which they couldn’t
understand so they would set up another appointment with us
and we would talk with them about what correspondence
they received and if they needed to submit additional documents. Again, scheduling a consistent
location was important because as long as they knew
we were there they could bring the subsequent correspondence
from Medicaid or the marketplace to us and they knew
we would be able to help them. We also during the appointments
had an intake form that had a little bit of demographic data
about the family, the languages they spoke, their primary written
and spoken language, and the consent forms for them
to actually agree for us to provide them services. Some of these consent forms
are all in English, but we are able to translate them
on the spot for families so they were signing things that
they understood and were well aware of what their rights were. So the work was not without
its challenges. Even with the Medicaid
appointments like I said, we often had to do follow up
visits when a family received correspondence about their
application, it would be in English and we would have
to interpret them. We tried to address this with
our local Medicaid program but it is not possible to get
in-language information to the families through
the office itself. And sometimes this has resulted
in denial of coverage when people don’t understand
the correspondence they received, if they don’t bring it to us,
we later hear that they were denied because
they waited too long. At present what is happening
in Arizona is the DES office that processes the Medicaid
applications is lagging behind some 45 days
or more from when an applicant first applies. There also appear to be some
glitches in the online system. When we upload documents
in the online system, the applicant will receive
correspondence that the documents have
not been received. So we still kind of struggle
to work with the application process itself, but it is
an ongoing advocacy effort. I’m sure it’s not unique to Asian
Pacific Americans, but it’s important to also
understand that when we work with cultural and linguistic
minorities we really should be prepared to play an advocacy
role with families and with communities and to be a platform
for some of the issues that they face with the local DES office or
with the Medicaid offices and with the marketplace as well. As Bonnie had mentioned earlier,
the immigration status can sometimes be an issue, finding
documents, finding the correct documents the families need. Often times when we try to submit
things on the marketplace for example, we knew when
we sometimes work with marketplace enrollees we found it
difficult to actually find the correct document upload so
we would have to send them by mail and hope
that they were received. It’s often a challenge to verify
a person’s ID on the marketplace application if they have
no credit history, and the language assistance for
Experian which does the identity verification of the marketplace
because they are not equipped to provide language assistance. So many times we are struggling
very much with those particular things, documenting status
and verifying ID. Much of that work is just ongoing
advocacy type of work, and that’s really why I say that,
much of this work still is advocacy type work. We provide the services but
we also have to be very mindful about what are people actually
experiencing, and be able to capture that information and
take those stories to those we know can make a difference
in the process and make it better for the families that we serve. Thank you, that’s all that
I have but I’m happy to answer any other questions.>>Donna Cohen Ross
Zeenat, thank you so much for your presentation. We’re going to get to questions
and answers in just a moment. But I think a couple
of things struck me about your presentation. First of all, I’m just so glad
for not only your work but so many of the beautiful
photographs that you shared, because it was so clear that
the community that you’re working in
is incredibly diverse. So the very challenging job that
you described I’m sure is even more challenging, considering all
of the different nuances that you need to be
aware of and respond to. So thank you so much for that. I want to move on to Riley,
or Sandy, I’m not sure who, is going to talk to us about
the resources from the Connecting Kids
to Coverage Campaign. We’re going to go through those
pretty quickly because we do have some questions on the chat
and we want to touch with those very quickly so that we can bring
some of our earlier speakers back into the conversation. But first, Riley,
is it your turn?>>Riley Greene
Yes, thanks Donna. I will take us through our
Connecting Kids to Coverage resources briefly
as you mentioned. So first up, we always want
to highlight of course our customizable print materials. These are free to order and
customizable with your program name, your state’s annual income
eligibility, your website and phone number, and up to two logos
for your organization and any partner organizations
you might work with. And on the next slide you’ll see
that we not only have a diverse array of types of materials,
but we also really try to provide a representative image library
that’s true of the diversity of our country. So very much in the vein of
culturally competent outreach materials, we provide diverse
imagery and we also provide a number of different languages. So our materials, all of them
come in English and Spanish, and then a number of them also
come in Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Hmong,
Tagalog, and Haitian Creole. So that is just a list of
the various languages that we have available in those
customizable print materials. We also have some online
resources, including social media resources. These include web banners and
buttons that you can post on your own website or your
partner organization’s website. We have social media graphics
like our little superhero there to the right that says “I’ve got
a good feeling about this.” And language, kind of turnkey
language to use for both Facebook and Twitter. Posts about the importance
of having health insurance, the benefits that are covered,
eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP, and so on and so forth. We’ve also developed a handful
of TV and radio public service announcements or PSAs. These are all in English and
Spanish, and we have a couple of different versions, a 30 second TV
and a 60 second radio PSA. We’ve developed along with that
a tip sheet for how to use these and pitch letters in both Spanish
and English to help you reach out to your local media outlets
and ask them to play the PSA in any extra air time
that they might have. We also encourage you to get
creative with how you use PSAs. You can ask provider networks
to play them on their closed
circuit television. We’ve had folks use the radio
PSA on outbound call recordings through school systems. So there are a lot of different
ways you can use these pre-recorded radio and TV spots
to spread the word about Medicaid and CHIP. Additionally, we have live
read radio scripts. These are essentially PSA scripts
that are available for local radio personalities to use on air
and inform their listeners about Medicaid and CHIP enrollment. All of these are available
in English and Spanish, and we have three different
links, a 15 second, 30 second, and 60 second. And again, this is something that
could be used in promotion with a media partnership on the ground
to spread the word to your local community about these programs. We also have template print
articles, so these are ready made articles in English and Spanish
that can be shared with local newspapers and media outlets. And beyond media outlets,
they can be used for local newsletters, school bulletins, or
other community communications. So these are downloadable
and you can customize them for what makes sense with your
community and of course with your organization’s information. Often times, community outlets
and other publications are looking for this kind
of content to share. If they have any space available,
you can share the word about Medicaid and CHIP. Finally, we encourage you
to visit InsureKidsNow.gov. As I shared with many of you via
the chat box today, all of our webinars
are available online. We post not only the slides but
a recording of the presentation so that you can revisit it
and share it with any colleagues you think would be interested. It usually takes us about two
weeks to get a webinar posted. So if you are looking for this
recording you can find it there. And then we also have
an outstanding outreach video library that focuses on
organizations like yours across the country who are doing
outstanding or innovative work in a certain area
of outreach and enrollment. So much like these webinars,
we seek to share best practices through that video content and
encourage you to check that out. In fact, we have an upcoming
video on the docket from some friends in Las Vegas about
enrolling not only kids but the entire family at point of
care and point of service that we’re looking forward
to sharing with you all. And finally, we want you
to stay in touch. You can email us at
[email protected] or give us a call
at 1-855-313-KIDS. We encourage you to reach out
with any questions from this webinar, questions about our
materials and resources and how best to use them, or just bounce
some ideas off of us for some outreach activities that you have
going on in your community. You should also sign up
for our eNewsletter if you haven’t already. This is where we announce
upcoming webinars, share any resources, spotlight
any grantees that are doing particularly outstanding work, and other great content that comes through that newsletter. And of course we’re on Twitter,
so be sure to follow us @IKNGov. So that wraps it up for
the Connecting Kids to Coverage Campaign materials. As Donna said, we have some
great questions that have come through the chat box. I will repeat that if you want
a copy of the presentation just let us know through
the chat box or it will be posted on InsureKidsNow.gov
in the coming weeks. That is our most popular
question of course. But Donna, we have a few more
queued up that I think we’ll kick us off with.>>Donna Cohen Ross
Great. Before we get to questions,
I just would be remiss if I did not mention and hopefully
remind folks because you already know that this month we are
celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Medicaid
program, Medicare as well. But we are particularly
focused on Medicaid. And as part of our recognition
of the fiftieth anniversary, every day for fifty days leading
up to the actual anniversary which is at the end of this month
on the 30th of July, we’ve been posting items about
the Medicaid program, highlights, examples of promising practices,
all kinds of things about the program on Medicaid.gov. And you can find a link
to those posts on the homepage of Medicaid.gov. We hope that
you’ll look at them, we hope that you’ll share
them with others. We’re really very eager to get
a lot of information out into the world about the Medicaid
program and how valuable it has been for millions
of people across the country now for 50 years. So that’s my commercial,
but I hope you do find the materials on Medicaid.gov
particularly useful. So let’s go to the questions now,
and Riley, because I’m not in the room with you I’m going
to ask you if you can help get us started.>>Riley Greene
Absolutely. So Wendy Schrader had a great
question that I think any number of our panelists could speak to. I’m going to read this out
and then open up the lines for Bonnie, Cara and Zeenat to hop
in as they want to. So Wendy asked, what are some
best practices for specific non-English speaking consumers
when enrolling to understand their coverage when there
is not an interpreter on staff at your agency, and you work in
a rural area where you cannot refer consumers to another agency
who specializes with folks who are not English proficient. So I think Wendy is really
looking for some guidance on when you can’t sort of reach
those ideal cultural competence and linguistic competence
standards, what are some best practices for still advocating
and helping that consumer through the enrollment process? Does anyone want to jump in
and take the lead there?>>Zeenat Hasan
I can start. This is Zeenat from Asian
Pacific Community in Action. I think it’s really important,
a number of things. First of all to have resources
on hand that are in different languages. And you might get an idea about
which language resources to keep on hand if you really know your
community, if you’ve done a good assessment of who lives in your
community, if you know where they live, to really be able
to know what languages are in your community,
I think you can be a little bit proactive about having those
language resources available in your offices or
wherever you are on hand. I think also having a really good
language access plan is actually a very specific thing and you can
search online for language access plan,
which gives you an idea for what do you do, actually,
it’s really to help you and your agency prepare
for what you do when you encounter someone who doesn’t speak English. It could be a telephonic
interpretation service that you end up using or it could be
a way that you reach this individual at a different
time when you do have language assistance available. Those are the two things that
I would mention.>>Riley Greene
Thanks so much Zeenat.>>Cara James
This is Cara. I think I would echo everything
that Zeenat said, and as you have heard both from the Connecting
Kids to Coverage and some of the other materials, there are
a number of resources that are available
in other languages. I think in terms of developing
a language access plan again I would refer you to the CLAS
Blueprint, which also has some tips on how you can develop that
language access plan to figure out what you can do when
those situations arise. And then I think in a worst case
scenario, I think another thing is to think about potential
partners who can help to support some of that translation in other
areas, and I know that you mentioned you are in a rural
area but there may be some community groups who can help
provide better connections or even to translate some of those
other materials if the resources aren’t quite available
in the languages that you need.>>Riley Greene
Great, thanks so much Cara. On that note, we did have someone
ask about sharing the translated materials that you mentioned
during your presentation Bonnie, but also Cara on your note
I think there are probably some great federally created resources
like the Coverage to Care resources that are translated. So I’m wondering if Cara and
then Bonnie can share where folks can find some of your translated
materials online, if that’s an easy URL
to share with the group?>>Cara James
Sure. Our resources are available
at marketplace.cms.gov/c2c. Again, that’s
marketplace.cms.gov/c2c. I should have mentioned
you can order in hard copy all of our materials
for free through that website, you will find a link to our
product ordering warehouse.>>Riley Greene
Great, thanks so much. And Bonnie, does APIAHF have
useable translated materials available on your website or
is that just work you’ve done in partnership
with organizations?>>Bonnie Kwon
We have… so the majority of the diversity of the outreach
materials are owned by our CBO partners, but we do have
a website with translated resources including
PowerPoints in, I can’t think right now how many languages
but several API languages that is basic education. Our website is www.apiahf.org/healthcare4me/action-health-justice.>>Riley Greene
I’m with you, I’m typing it out and I’ll send it to everyone.>>Bonnie Kwon
Okay. So if you go on down the left top
corner there is a way that you can browse ACA resources. Specifically for the glossary
I mentioned with over 100 enrollment terms,
if folks could email me I can put you in touch with the project
lead on those glossaries. They are not freely available
to the public as of now, there is a small fee that
we’re asking folks to pay since it was a resource that was
developed with considerable investment from our network. But it is a sliding scale
for community organizations. If folks email me directly
at [email protected], I can connect you
with more information.>>Riley Greene
Thanks Bonnie.>>Cara James
I’m sorry, if I could for just a second. I forgot one other resource
that would be also helpful. So the CMS Office
on Minority Health, we’ve tried to compile a list
of all the documents that CMS has translated for Medicare,
Medicaid and the marketplace into one place,
and that document, our language access document,
we update that every few months. That is available on
our CMS OMH website, which is
go.cms.gov/cms-omh.>>Riley Greene
I’m going to send that out through the chat. Thanks so much Cara. I think we have time for
one more question that I don’t think any of
our speakers have addressed here. It comes from Julia Schoenberger,
and she is asking about innovative ways that you all
have seen to fund efforts to reach different cultures. Julia is making the fair point
that while her organization and community are in agreement that
this is important work to do, they often struggle to find
the resources to do it. So I wonder if anyone on the line
can speak to innovative partnerships or other funding
streams that might support this kind of work.>>Cara James
This is Cara. I would say that one of
the efforts that is available right now, and I think the
application period is still open. The HHS Office of Minority Health
has a PICC grant program, in which they are funding
organizations specifically focused on outreach to minority
and other underserved communities for coverage through the
marketplace, Medicaid and CHIP. So again, that is the HHS Office
of Minority Health, and Riley I can send you
the link to the grant application in a few minutes.>>Riley Greene
Great. I also just sent that through
the chat as a friendly reminder that you all can copy and paste
HHS Office of Minority Health PICC Program. So I think that covers it
in terms of questions. A lot of you asked to follow up
on the customizable materials from Connecting Kids to Coverage. I’m going to repeat what is
customizable and the languages that we have quickly here. So you can order,
so the customization is free of charge, you just incur
any printing costs. You can customize the print
materials to have your program name, your state’s
FPL eligibility number relevant to your program,
your organization’s website and/or phone number,
and up to two logos. So you can customize that
to make sure that you are guiding your community to local
application assistance with your organization
or partner organization. Again, that list of languages,
all of our materials are available in English and Spanish,
and many are available in Portuguese, Chinese, Korean,
Vietnamese, Hmong, Tagalog, and Haitian Creole. So that pretty much covers the
broad swath of our questions. If we didn’t get to anything that
you want to follow up on, Jenna can I ask you to go back
to our contact slide so that folks who have follow ups for our
speakers or follow ups for the Connecting Kids to Coverage
resources can get in touch. And Donna, I will hand this over
to you for some closing remarks.>>Donna Cohen Ross
Great, thank you so much Riley. Thank you to all of our speakers,
Cara James, Bonnie Kwon and Zeenat Hasan, and thank you
to all of you for participating in today’s webinar. I’ve been watching on my screen
and I can see we had close to 300 people throughout the entire
webinar, where folks are starting to leave us now but
we’re done so that’s okay. We particularly again want
to thank our speakers. I wanted to mention one other
thing because it goes to some of the questions that folks were
asking about, materials and appropriate translations. One of our speakers mentioned how
difficult it is and how important it is to make sure that these
are done well, and you do a lot of back and
forth with people who speak the language that you are trying
to interpret your materials in. We’ve had this experience with
Connecting Kids to Coverage where we’ve had people ask us
for our materials in a particular language that we don’t have. So we’ve often tried to turn
the challenge back into a partnership and work with
a community organization, if they have folks who might be
able to do a translation what we would ask and we would pose
this to anyone, if you have someone who could do
the translation and we could get a separate
independent organization to read and comment on
the translation to make sure that it’s appropriate,
we will work with you to create the material in the language that
you need and do the design work so that you’ll be able
to download that material from our website and also share
it with others in other places that might need it. So if you have that need and
think that we can work together to make it happen for you,
please let us know and we’ll do our best to work
with you to get the job done. So once again,
I want to thank everybody. Watch your email for an
announcement of our next webinar, and we will say goodbye
this afternoon and have a good rest of your day.>>Riley Greene
Thanks everyone, goodbye.

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