Title VI Workshop: Preparing Students for High Need Occupations – September 19, 2017

Title VI Workshop: Preparing Students for High Need Occupations – September 19, 2017


TIM DUVALL: Welcome
to our first session. It is called Preparing
Students for High-Need Occupations. We have Joyce Steffan from
Ohio State University and Eric Feldman from Florida
International University. They’re going to talk to
us today about a couple of programs that they’ve run,
very successful programs, in fact, award winning,
in fact, programs, for students. Joyce Steffan is going to
talk about the Ohio Export Internship program and
Eric Feldman is going to talk about the Internship
Consultation program at the Center for Latin
American and Caribbean Studies at Florida
International University. Each presenter is going
to take about 10 to 15 minutes to present their
slides, and after that, we’ll have time for
questions and answers. You can ask your questions
and answer in the chat box at the bottom
of your screen. And then we will review
them at the end, and I’ll ask them to our were
presenters so that they can provide any answers
that might be of interest to you. So, first up, we have
Joyce Steffan from the Fisher College
of Business. She’s the Director of our
Center for International Business Education
and Research. Part of what we’re doing
with this Technical Assistance Webinar is to
celebrate our programs, to talk about what we’ve been
doing in the last 3 or 4 years while these programs
have been ongoing, and also, we will be providing
technical assistance for the next round
of competitions. This one is a
celebratory panel. And we’ll start
with Joyce Steffan. Joyce? JOYCE STEFFAN:
Thanks, Tim. Good morning, everyone,
and greetings from the Ohio State University. I’d like to share with
you this morning the best practice at the OSU CIBER,
initiated back in 2012 that demonstrates the
positive impact of partnerships between
the state of Ohio, its universities and
private industry. The Ohio State University
and state of Ohio Ohio Development Agency formed
a strategy partnership with the goal to train
a global workforce, grow export sales and create
jobs within small to medium size
Ohio companies. The overall mission was to
help close the skills gap between Ohio companies
that needed employees, who knew how to export and
students from universities across the state of Ohio
who have developed those critical global
business skills. However, before I speak
specifically about the Ohio Export Internship
program, I’d like to explain in a little more
detail how the idea came to fruition. During our grant writing
process, our focus of the grant would relate to
various activities and initiatives that would
impact the global workforce development. I’m sure you would all
agree that closing a national skills gap, as it
related to then President Obama’s National Export
Initiative, would be an impact or an initiative
not only to Ohio’s economy but also provide a
valuable opportunity for students across the state
to develop an important global competency for
companies who were challenged with finding
the right talent to expand their export capabilities. We knew that many small
and medium size Ohio companies lacked the
resources, the bandwidth, and many times an
understanding of the export function. They seem to be reactive
to an export opportunity and we wanted to help them
be more proactive in their global strategies. So we worked with the
state of Ohio, DSA to create a unique
partnership between these Ohio universities and
these small to medium size Ohio companies to apply
classroom learning to current business
challenges faced by our companies in today’s
global economy. A competitive application
and selection process at the Ohio State University,
Youngstown State University, and now
Cleveland State University yields a talented group
of students every year who learn in a spring semester
classroom environment and applied that learning
in a 12-week paid summer internship experience
where they have the chance to work with real
people at real companies exporting real products. Based on results as self
reported by the companies, the Ohio Export Internship
program has succeeded in training students from
many universities across the state in the
fundamentals of exporting and placing them with
these companies to apply that knowledge. Our interns have helped
companies develop new markets, identify new
distributors, and recruit new customers. We carefully match those
students who have language capabilities or cultural
knowledge of specific countries to those
companies across the state who have that need. And these companies are
creating new jobs to sustain those global
strategies, and that’s really what this program
was designed to do: create jobs and impact
Ohio’s economy. We’re proud to say that
the projects our interns have worked on have
impacted Ohio’s expected export sales by
over $25.5 million. That’s pretty significant,
and we’re very proud of the fact that the Ohio
Export Internship was recognized in
2016 by the U.S. Department of Commerce by
receiving the President’s eAward for export
excellence. So thanks for your
interest in learning more about the Ohio State CIBER
Initiative and I’m happy to answer any questions
when the time comes. Thank you. TIM DUVALL: Joyce, I
wonder if I can ask real quickly, since we have a
little bit of time, when you talk about the interns
developing new markets, what are you referring to,
or is it new markets that are developed? You said there
are 47 of them? What does that mean? JOYCE STEFFAN: Correct. So, the companies self
report every year the impact of what the student
interns have accomplished. During the class the
students learn a very intricate market research
matrix that helps companies understand where
they should be exporting. Sometimes companies aren’t
quite sure if they should be expanding their markets
to Mexico or expanding their markets to Nicaragua
or wherever that might be. So, by developing this
market matrix, these interns are able to go in,
use various resources that they’ve learned, identify
what is the best market for that particular
company’s product. They’re doing
competitor analysis. They’re doing a variety
of things that help that company decide, from an
objective way, a factual way, where they should be
expanding their markets. And it’s proven to be
successful because the companies are, indeed,
expanding their strategies to include more companies
than what they might have done before the
intern arrived. TIM DUVALL: So is the
internship credit bearing? JOYCE STEFFAN:
Actually, it is. It’s a 3-credit hour
class during the Spring semester. And students from not only
Ohio State who enroll in the class that I teach
here, I also have students from ten other
universities who come to Ohio State, take the class
here on our campus, and are enrolled at their
home institution in a 3-credit-hour class. TIM DUVALL:
Thank you, Joyce. Next up, we have Eric
Feldman from Florida International University. He’s going to talk
about the Internship Consultation program that
is run out of the Latin American and Caribbean
Studies Center at Florida International University. Eric? ERIC FELDMAN: Hi, good morning. So I’m Eric Feldman, I’m
the Internship Coordinator with the Kimberly Green
Latin American and Caribbean Center here
at Florida International University in Miami. I’m going to say the next
slide, I’m not sure if I see them for procedure’s
sake, so next slide. The purpose of our
career-centered internship program is to prepare
our students for the workforce, while also
increasing awareness of the Latin American and
Caribbean region in general. Our target population is
students in our School of International and Human
Development so that future K-12 and higher educators
of the United States will be able to impart informed
perspectives about the Latin American and
Caribbean region which I’ll refer to as the LACC
region for brevity sake throughout the
presentation. Towards this end, we
place a primary focus on a particular Master’s Degree
called FIU’s Masters and International and
Intercultural Education. We formed a partnership
with the program leaders of this program and
communicate with these students directly by email
about specific internship opportunities, as well as
our consultation services in general. And we also host
information sessions for students in all of our
education related majors. This focus on education,
students aside however, that LACC internship
program is for any and all FIU students who wish have
to have an internship that enhances their awareness
of the LACC region while also preparing them
for overall economic opportunity
after graduation. There are two programs
that we leverage at the undergraduate level to
help students encourage the participation in
internships and help them find internships and these
are the Global Learning Medallion and Peace
Corps prep students. Though separate from the
Internship Consultation program, they represent
combined enrollment of about 1,200 students who
have signed up for one or both of those programs out
of our Office of Global Learning Initiatives and
all of those students have expressed an enhanced
interest in global awareness perspective and
engagement, making them a great population to
help find internships. Internship opportunities
are also sent directly to all the students signed
up for those programs, and the completing internship
experiences counts towards earning multiple
designations and awards that are conferred
out of those programs. So I heard one of the
questions from the last presentation was whether
or not they’re credit bearing and so this is an
interesting take where, in addition to students
potentially getting academic credit for their
internships and depending on what academic program
they’re in, we have an infrastructure for
having these internship experiences count
as credit towards co-curricular awards and
designations that the University confers. And I’ll go to the
next slide, please. Our internship
consultation services are similar in nature to what
you might expect to find at a career services
office at your own universities, with the
main distinguishing factor being the focus on the
LACC region as opposed to separating the types
of internships that we advertise or the students
that we support by their major or the industry
of the internship. We curate and distribute
all internships pertaining to the LACC region,
whether those internships might be related to sales,
marketing, consulting, nonprofit, instead of
working on the social issues or academic
publications etcetera. In addition to
highlighting specific opportunities, we work
with students in one or more hour consultation
sessions to develop customized internship
search strategies so students can find
additional internships beyond the ones we even
know about, and we provide support for writing and
editing resumes and cover letters and other
application materials as necessary. And we are fully
accessible to provide the support to students over
the phone, in person, by email, as well as through
comprehensive resources that are available on our
website that students can review at their
own leisure. And next slide, please. Our consultation process
is co-created by the students and myself, the
Internship Coordinator, and we clearly outline who
is responsible for what each step of the way. So in order for our one
hour long consultation session to be as
productive as possible each student is asked to
consider in advance what type of internship they’re
looking for, including what locations are open to
them, what field they want to work in, the type of
employer, whether that be government, an
educational institution, a corporation, a nonprofit,
what language skills might be required by
that internship. Our students in Miami
have a variety of language skills but they might want
an internship that helps them develop something
they’re not proficient in. They might not be
looking for that. They might already be
fluent in something and want to practice that,
and whether they require having a paid internship
considering their personal circumstances. The form that students
fill out on our website to request a consultation
actually asks them to fill out answers to each of
these types of thing, because perhaps
unsurprisingly, students will show up to me or
email me and say that they want an internship
and I have no idea. Well, are you willing to
travel to Washington, DC for a semester here for an
internship, and sometimes they haven’t even thought
about that, so getting these questions prompted
right away is very helpful. Then, as the Internship
Coordinator, I provide internship suggestions and
search strategies that are tailored to their answers
and, when necessary, contact employers to
determine the availability of internships. So this kind of
goes both ways. Sometimes I’ll know of an
internship or have already found one and send it to
a whole list of students, other times, based on what
a student tells me they’re interested in, I might
have thought of something or find an opportunity
that we’ve never sent before and contact that
organization to see if they do take interns or
would be willing to take interns. Together, the students
and I prepare resumes and personal statements,
practice for interviews, and apply internship
experiences for credit towards FIU programs
depending on which programs they are. Since I’m dealing with
students from a variety majors and programs, if
and how they count for credit is quite variable. Next slide, please. Our straightforward and
effective Internship Consultation program helps
about 40 students per year from across all majors and
academic levels, secure internship experiences in
a variety of fields and locations. This slide aims to
highlight the diversity of both the type of student
that we serve as well as the types of opportunities
that we have helped those students, while
demonstrating how each student is more uniquely
prepared for success in important and in
demand careers. So multiple students that
we’ve helped place have gotten internships in the
direct vicinity of campus, you know, within miles of
our campus here in Miami, that provide them direct
access to the Latin American and Caribbean
region so, on the business front, we’re the primary
provider of marketing and sales interns to a local
company that sells kitchen appliances to Latin
American clients. And we also have
recently developed great relationships with two
large media companies that you’re probably familiar
with: NBC Universal and ABC Worldwide. They both have offices
here in Miami that are specifically focused
on their Latin American operations, and we’ve,
just in this past semester, have had
students placed off of those, so that’s an
example of the corporate sector and local
placements. On the social issue’s
front, there are nonprofits like Globalize
Miami and organizations that have hosted a
local human trafficking conference and students
have had local internships in that nonprofit space. We also have students
placed internationally and our recurring
International Internship placement is with an
organization called Blue Energy located in
Bluefields, Nicaragua, and we’ve had nine total FIU
students who have spent a summer in Bluefields
working on sustainable development and
environmental protection programs and sustainable
energy programs. And then I also have
on here examples of two students. Lili, who is an
undergraduate, and Ed, who is graduate student
working towards a second career. Both of them have had
virtual internships and Ed actually has had two
different virtual internships. Lili’s internship, which
was fully virtual, which involved viral mapping
Zika, the spread of Zika for the Alliance For
Global Justice, is directly applicable to her
course preparation as an aspiring doctor. And Ed’s two virtual
internships is the Latin American New Digest
publication and U.S. Department of State,
certainly complement his Latin American and
Caribbean studies Masters degree and will make him
more marketable for his desired types
of employment. Both of the students are
actually enrolled in the programs I mentioned
earlier, the Global Leaning Medallion and
Peace Corps Prep program, so they will not only help
them earn awards out of those programs, but both
of those programs require a substantive reflective
ePortfolio which helps them process what they’ve
learned but is also publicly available online
so that they can have their website as a tool to
use during the job search process. So, that is not a built in
part of every student who gets an internship with
us, since we do encourage students to participate in
those programs, there is that added benefit of
their internship then being reflected on
and available on their websites. And I will go to the next
and final slide, please. So, you know, like the
previous presentation I look forward to spending
more time on questions, as I gave a basic overview
and where I can provide detail about programs, I
do have on the screen my contact information, and
just in case you have any trouble seeing it, my
email is really easy. I’m Eric F. My email address is
[email protected], and I would love for you to see our
website for yourself, so I’ll just say it really
quickly in case it’s small or there’s any issues:
lacc.fiu.edu/academics/int ernships. You can see highlighted
opportunities, the consultation request form,
our resume, advice on all the information we have
on there, and our partner office, which is the
Office of Global Learning, is at goglobal.fiu.edu,
where you can read more about the Medallion and
Peace Corps Prep programs. Thank you so much
for your time. TIM DUVALL: If you could
maybe tell us a little bit more about the Global
Learning Medallion. You indicated that it’s
used as part of your outreach efforts, but
is there more to it than that? How does it apply to
this particular program? ERIC FELDMAN: Absolutely. So the Medallion is a
program that’s open to all undergraduate students
who are interested in international and
intercultural learning and so, once they apply for
this program, they can earn an actual physical
Medallion shaped like a global at graduation,
and in order to do that, there’s a specific
combination of courses, activities, and events
on campus, leadership programs like alternative
break service trips or having leadership position
in a club, and then doing either internships,
research projects, study abroad, or language
courses, as well as doing that reflective
ePortfolio. So while this is separate
from our Internship Consultation program,
since internships are one opportunity to fulfill the
Medallion requirements, and we provide
consultation for internships and all of
this is within the realm of global learning, we
advertise the internships that we are highlighting
to students in that program, and encourage
students who might not be in that program who we
provide a consultation to, to perhaps join that
program, because then not only will they have gotten
an internship through us, you know, that internship
can count towards a significant part of
earning this University award. And then, that award
program, which I’m also very involved with,
provides advertisements to students, so it’s not just
go do these activities, like, you know, a lecture,
they get sent those opportunities. So a student might get one
of our internships with NBC Universal, if I
haven’t suggested they sign up for the Medallion,
then they’ll start receiving emails about
other events that they might not have known about
but might extend the real world learning that they
got at their internship. TIM DUVALL: So is it fair
to say that there’s sort of a synergy between
the two programs? ERIC FELDMAN: Absolutely. Positively. Yes. TIM DUVALL: Okay. Okay. Thank you. Thank you for that, Eric. Appreciate it. Now we are going to
take some questions. And we have quite
a few of them here. I will read out the
question and direct it to the appropriate panelist. So, Joyce, Gloria,
from the University of Michigan, wonders: Who
pays for the internship? Is it the company? JOYCE STEFFAN: Yes. The company pays the
student wages at $15 an hour, and the Development
Services Agency then has a grant that we reimburse
the companies 50 percent of those students’ wages. So the company has a
little bit of skin in the game and it makes it an
attractive option for the companies to sort of test
the water, if they have not implemented any sort
of export functions within their company. So, yes, the companies do
pay, and we reimburse the companies up to 50 percent
of the wages to a maximum of $3,600 for the
12-week internship. TIM DUVALL: And that’s
the way it is across the board? It’s $15 an hour for
every internship? That that’s just
part of this program? JOYCE STEFFAN:
That’s correct. That’s correct. We standardized the wages,
it made it a little more fair. We are matching
the students. The companies don’t get to
pick their student intern and the students don’t
get to pick their company. So it’s sort of an art and
a science in the matching process, and it seems to
have worked very well and the companies typically
have been very happy with the students. Once in a while we’ll
have a student who maybe doesn’t have quite the
language capability that they had hoped for, but
for the most part, the matching process has
worked very well. TIM DUVALL: When you’re
matching, you look into, say, what their interests
are, what their training is, how that might
contribute to the internship, and might not
only contribute to the company, but also
contribute to the student’s
learning outcome? JOYCE STEFFAN:
That’s correct. So when a company decides
that they’re going to participate our DSA
partners will meet with them, interview the
company, the companies are selected just as
competitively as the students are. And so the companies
will develop a scoping document, identify the
specifics about what it is that they want to do,
in tandem with, usually, someone from our SBDC,
Small Business Development Center, or Export
Assistance Network Director who is working
with the companies and knows the needs of the
companies very well. And so once the scoping
document has been designed, then
we look at that. We look at the skill sets
that they need, so if they need website translation
or if they need someone who has strong market
research skills, we’ll match the student
with those skill sets. And we also match the
student preferences, because sometimes students
want to work in a specific industry. Sometimes they want to
work in an export service environment. Sometimes they want to
work in a logistical arena or maybe they are
interested in the financial aspect or
compliance aspect of one of the scopes. So we match that
very carefully. We do ask the students
to relocate if they’re willing to, so geographic
preference is important. A student who might be
here, enrolled at Ohio State but lives in
Cleveland, might be interested in working in
Northeast Ohio so that they can live at home. Our students have been
pretty creative in how they identify
summer housing. We’ve had them, you know,
sublease, we’ve had them cost-share, so, yes,
sometimes the students will have to relocate
for the summer as well. TIM DUVALL:
Thank you, Joyce. Keith Snodgrass asks,
Joyce: If you can tell us which programs were taught
in the Export program. Sorry, which languages-did
I say programs? Which languages were
taught in the Export program. JOYCE STEFFAN: Well, we
don’t teach languages in the program, but I have a
wide variety of students who already have
language proficiency. So I do admit
international students in the program. So, for example, I had
a student who was from China, who obviously spoke
Mandarin very well, but she also was proficient in
Spanish and so we placed her with an Ohio company
that was very interested in expanding their
exports to China. So she helped them do
that, but she also helped them expand their
market into Peru. So the company actually
ended up hiring her, and she’s done a very nice
job, because she has those two language capabilities,
able to expand the markets in that specific region,
identified by the extensive market research
by the student as well. TIM DUVALL: Your
internships-this is from Alan Paul-your internships
are obviously, that some of them are obviously at
least domestic, but are any of them abroad? Do any of the
interns go overseas? JOYCE STEFFAN: Well
actually, yes, once in a while. We do have students
who will travel to international trade shows,
but that’s usually pretty rare. We did have a student who
went to India with his supervisor. We had a student who
went down to Peru. We had a student who
went to Nicaragua. It is possible, but
it’s usually more rare. TIM DUVALL: I mean the
goal is to help Ohio companies, in particular,
with expanding exports, is that right? JOYCE STEFFAN: That’s
absolutely correct. So we focus on the small
to medium size Ohio company that, as I had
mentioned, either doesn’t have the bandwidth,
doesn’t have the resources, or doesn’t have
the functional knowledge. So think about that
overworked domestic sales manager who receives an
email from someone in Nicaragua who wants to
order a thousand of their widgets, so the sales
manager says, “Hm, yeah, I think we can do that,”
thinking to himself, yeah, I’m going to meet my
monthly sales quota. Tells the company,
yes, we can did that. And then sits back and
says, “Oh, okay, how am I going to do that?” This is where our intern
comes into play because that’s a reactive kind
of export strategy. They’re reacting to the
phone call, the email that they might get and our
interns are able to help them be much more
proactive about that and identify those markets and
that strategy that they would have in terms
of identifying the distributor, identifying
the mode of entry, identifying how you’re
going to get your product there, identifying how
you’re going to get paid. And so those are important
functions that sometimes our interns are actually
teaching to their supervisors. And they will many
times create a manual, a documentation manual
about how they did things. Sometimes they’re creating
compliance manuals. So, teaching a little bit
or training some of their colleagues that they work
with in their companies during the summer. TIM DUVALL:
Thank you, Joyce. Also, let’s see, Mel
Jameson at UNLV is wondering how the
companies are identified or recruited. Now, what’s the
process for that? JOYCE STEFFAN: So,
the state of Ohio is responsible for
sourcing the companies. So we do a lot of
advertising or they do through their SBDCs or
export assistance centers, or, you know, an economic
development entity. We have 88 counties, each
of them have an economic development entity. And we work very
closely with them. We do association
meetings, we’re sending out email blasts, so the
longer that we’ve been doing this, the more
awareness that companies have about it and they
talk to each other at a variety of meetings,
organizations, whatever that might be. So they apply online
through the Ohio Development Services
Agency, just like our students do. So the universities –
YSU, Youngtown State University, Cleveland
State University, and Ohio State, we are responsible
for recruiting and selecting the students. DSA with their SBDC
partners are responsible for sourcing the
companies, interviewing the companies, and then we
all work together during the course and during
the internship, itself. We have weekly conference
calls where we are looking at status reports that
the students send in every week, identifying where we
might have an issue, and then we resolve that. TIM DUVALL: Let’s bring
Eric into this discussion. Eric, basically the same
question: How do you identify outside partners
for your program? ERIC FELDMAN: Such
a variety of ways. Some of them are very
personal connections, such as FIU alumni. We actively survey alumni
from our programs and see where they’re working and
if they have internships available, and sometimes
we just hear from them to see if they have
internships available. So a good example of
that is the international nonprofit Church World
Service that does refugee resettlement and we had
many alumni of our Latin American Caribbean Center
work there, so he we found out from them about
internships and have placed students there,
for example, as that’s the same case as our
International Rescue Committee. We’re very fortunate in
Miami to have offices of these sorts of
international nonprofits near campus so that
way the NBC Universal internship also was from
an FIU alumni who is working in the managerial
position at NBC Universal, and that’s fortunately a
well paying internship. Other internships have
been simple online research, for example. So, with the Alliance for
Global Justice, which I mentioned the lead was
doing viral mapping of Zika for that organization
was through searching the Internet for organizations
that are focused on issues of Latin America
and the Caribbean. So we seek a variety of
kind of personal contacts and just other means to
find places and then we try to maintain as close
of a relationship as possible with those
internship providers so that I hear directly
from them when they have placements if they have
any particular new needs or new type of position
they haven’t done before. And so I think the
relationship management aspect is something I
would peg as being very vital, that, you know, you
just send quick emails of hey, how are you doing? Do you need anything,
is everything fine? And that really builds
a relationship where I’m hearing about any
opportunities they might have, perhaps exclusively
or before other people. TIM DUVALL: Thank you. Clark Bonilla at
Georgetown has asked a number of questions
of you, Eric. He’s curious about foreign
language, how foreign languages play into the
internships, if there’s a proficiency requirement,
is it only Spanish, or is Portuguese and Creole
included, those kinds of things, if maybe you
could answer some of those questions. ERIC FELDMAN: Absolutely. That’s a great question. Because our program
doesn’t have its own requirements, the
requirements are then those are the organization
or company providing the internship, and language
often does play a role. I would say a majority of
the internships that we offer to our students do
require a high degree of Spanish proficiency
which luckily many of our students in Miami do have,
so certainly those NBC and BBC Latin America
marketing offices require that, for example. I do try to actively
search for internships that do utilize other
language like Portuguese and Creole so that our
students that might have that proficiency or be
working on developing that proficiency through our
courses can practice it in a professional setting,
and the best example I have of that is an
organization called Prospectiva, which is a
public policy consulting firm in Brazil that has a
Miami office and so that has been our go-to
opportunity for our students who are
practicing Portuguese proficiency to use that
in a professional setting. TIM DUVALL: Sara Maxim at
CAL Berkeley is asking a question that is probably
going to be of great interest to the people
tuning into this session. This is for Eric. She’s wondering if your
internship program is directly funded by the NRC
Title VI grant and, if it is, what are the program
target goals when you’re doing your
reporting to Ed? ERIC FELDMAN: I’m careful
to answer that sort of question too specifically,
because I don’t directly prepare the report
that gets submitted in. Our program is structured
so I am the student-facing coordinator who finds the
internships and works with the students to
apply it for them. So on all of the reporting
cycles that are necessary for this program, what I
prepare is a comprehensive list of the total number
of consultations that I hosted and what majors
those students were from. The total number of
applications that I am aware of students having
submitted as a result of our consultations, and
what organizations those were to, as well as the
number of placements that I’ve confirmed where I’ve
actually verified that the student was placed at that
organization and that also does have the company
or organization that the students were placed in. So that does give a
nice picture of kind of outcomes in terms of
there’s a large number of consultations, some
percentage of those students apply, and
some percentage of those students are accepted. And so I provide those
numbers to others in our Latin American Caribbean
Center who prepare the official reporting,
but I am unfortunately considering that this
Workshop is focused on some of these aspects
don’t personally prepare the report that goes, you
know, back externally to really know how they
frame that in terms of the target funding goals. TIM DUVALL: That
was worth a shot. Right? Amanda Wolf is wondering
more, Eric, about the Global Learning Medallion. She’s wondering is that
specific to LACC or if it’s a program that’s
administered at the University level with
campus wide support. ERIC FELDMAN: Yes, that is
a great question and the answer is the latter. So FIU has a very unique
and amazing program, if I say so myself, called
Global Learning for Global Citizenship, and that is
an effort that has been ongoing for almost seven
years now to make sure that every single student,
regardless of their major, does get exposure
to global awareness perspective engagement
both in and out of the classroom. So what happens here at
FIU is we have a list of currently about
195 courses in all undergraduate majors that
have been specifically designed to give
international, intercultural perspective,
including majors like biology and criminal
justice, not just the international types of
majors, and every single one of our undergraduate
students, we have over 40,000 undergraduate
students, all of them take at least two of those
courses and then the Global Learning Medallion
is the centerpiece of the co-curricular component
of that where, in order to expand that beyond the
classroom, students can go to the lectures and
events, they can use our support to apply for
internships and to develop research projects and
join clubs and things like that. So the Medallion is part
of that initiative which is available to all majors
and administered, yes, at the University level
through the office called the Office of Global
Learning Initiatives. TIM DUVALL: Also, I
actually want to ask this question of both of you,
but I’ll start with Eric. Do you have a handle
on what University departments
participate in this? I mean obviously this is
administered out of LACC, but are there other
departmental partners on campus? ERIC FELDMAN: I personally
tried to as direct to students as possible. I think the partnerships
are incredibly important in any initiative at a
university, but there are also a lot of staff and
a lot of offices, and especially at an
institution as large as FIU with a total student
population of nearly 55,000, I have just
personally found it to be beneficial to contact
students directly by doing what I’ve described
earlier in terms of getting access to email
the 1200 Medallion students to email directly
all of the students in the International
Intercultural Education Masters program directly,
and so, certainly there are some partnerships in
terms of being able to access those students, but
that partnership, I guess then, is mostly about
being able to access the students directly and
work with them directly. TIM DUVALL: I’ll ask
the question a slightly different way then. The students that take
part in the internship program, are they from
different departments? I mean, do you get
engineering students, do you get business students,
do you get political science students? You know, is
that the case? ERIC FELDMAN: Yes. Absolutely. So they’re from a variety
of departments and when I prepare that report, you
know, for reporting back, I do separate it out
by major and there’s representation from across
majors that’s probably a result of the, you know,
Medallion and other places that we advertise being
populated themselves by students from a
variety of majors. But, yes, absolutely. There are business majors
doing those marketing internships and there have
definitely been at least one engineering student
who has done the Blue Energy program
in Nicaragua. So, yes is the answer. TIM DUVALL: And,
Joyce, same question. I’m wondering if – and
I’m not the only one, this came up on my screen,
by the way – what other departments are
represented? I mean, obviously, it’s
probably international business students because
it’s a pretty specific program that you have, but
are there other university departments that you
recruit students from for this? JOYCE STEFFAN:
Well, yes, actually. So our program is
specifically identified for business students,
not just international business students. So we have a wide range
of specializations. We also have some business
minors, we’ve had an international relations
student who was a business minor who participated
and did a great job. We also have MBA students,
so this past year I had three MBA students from
Fisher, plus a few from a couple of other
universities, and they interact in the classroom
the same way with all the undergrad students. Most of the cohort is
comprised of undergraduate students, so at Youngtown
state, I think they are all business students, but
the business students are a wide variety of
specializations. Again, having students who
have a finance major and the project scope is
really related about setting up, you know,
a payment process or a currency exchange, or
credit insurance, or whatever that might
be, that’s the kind of matching focus
that we look at. So we don’t entertain
students who are, you know, biology majors
or anything like that. They do need to
have a fairly strong understanding of business. And so that’s
what we look for. TIM DUVALL: And, Joyce,
how do you assess language proficiency or do
you assess language proficiency before you
place a student in an internship? And if so, how
do you assess it? JOYCE STEFFAN: Well, most
of the students are, you know, so we have a lot
of students from China, India, you know, a lot of
– we have a strong Spanish language minor. So if a student is
enrolled as a Spanish minor, language minor,
then we feel pretty confident that they’re
going to have a good understanding of that. So as part of my program,
I don’t do a language proficiency assessment. I’m going to assume that
if a student is a Spanish minor, or is from China,
or from Peru, or from one of those countries that
they have a pretty good command of their
own language. TIM DUVALL:
Thank you, Joyce. It looks as if that’s all
of the questions we have. I suppose I can give
another minute or two for a couple more
questions to come in. If there’s anything else,
now is your chance to enter a question
into the chat box. And we have Eric and
Joyce here to answer your questions. Why don’t we give it
another minute or so. [Pause.] Looks like we had a moment
of silence, instead. So I think that’s all of
our questions, I would like to thank Joyce
Steffan from Ohio State University and our CIBER
at Ohio State and Eric Feldman at Florida
International University and our NRC there. Thank you very
much for your time. Thank you for sharing
all of this information. And I hope you
have a good day.

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