Success means determination, perseverance, generosity – Nicoleta Munteanu, Romania

Success means determination, perseverance, generosity – Nicoleta Munteanu, Romania


The concept of success is difficult to quantify nowadays,
if one approaches it from a long term point of view. If success is being sought after for its own sake,
then things are quite different. Ideally between what the school has to offer and one’s
personal career path there should be a strong connection. Usually the school does not provide more than general
knowledge that is more or less solid depending on each of us. What I really consider crucial to develop during our school years are
mainly ambition, perseverance, generosity and care towards others. Being a successful person cannot be defined in other terms. If these assets lack at an early age, it is quite hard to become
other than a rapacious being, seeking to obtain an easy success. I do not think this can apply in the case of a truly successful person. The Alecart project was conceived to promote
the reverse of what the current system has to offer. It is a project born mainly out of revolt, especially in the context
where literature and cultural growth are primarily quantified based on olympiads’ and other school contests’ results or based on the
number of prizes a student or the teacher accumulates over the school years. We have tried and still try to offer an alternative through
the Alecart cultural project, mainly to create a school of literature. Within this school students can get closer to the true spirit of
contemporary culture through lively, unfeigned discussions, without pride or preconceptions; simply with their
minds and hearts open towards everything that is new. We had the privilege to be supported from the very
beginning by renowned people from the cultural scene. I am talking about the university professor Mrs. Elvira Sorohan, about the Vice Dean of the Philology Faculty,
prof. Antonio Patras and Daniel Sandru, political scientist and Director of the “Timpul” (“The Time”) newspaper. There were people who believed in this idea,
who supported and are still supporting us; what we managed to achieve through Alecart is mainly to seek
the passion for literature in those amongst us. As long as ‘revolt’ can be a constructive element and
not just a wrangle about displeasing things, then it can surely become the engine
of a successful phenomenon or project. to mention that at the core of Alecart lie the youths,
the teenagers- to be who are by their nature revolted about
the traditional system of the school. The constructive type of revolt should,
therefore, be at the foundation of any cultural idea. In fact, big cultural projects are born out of revolt. Regarding the guiding figure, this status is
probably linked to the coordinators. You cannot just be enlivened by the idea of doing something,
you cannot just play with the minds and hearts of these young people if you are not ruled by the wish to guide them, to help them represent a mature reality of
existence – of the literary and cultural phenomenon, in this case. Without a guiding role, a cultural project cannot withstand. Mrs. Nicoleta Munteanu makes a clear-cut distinction between
the real type of success that is achieved in a longer period of time and the easy kind that is obtained simply like a lottery
prize and for the mere desire of becoming prestigious. It is justified to make this distinction. In regards to the success of the
students to which school can contribute, Mrs. Munteanu thinks that the emphasis should rather be shiftedfrom
the information and knowledge transfer to that of personal development. Some important personal assets are
generosity, ambition, perseverance and from her point of view, (and mine, as a
matter of fact) these traits are the key to success. Alecart is a cultural project, thought out and coordinated by
Mr. and Mrs. Munteanu and it offers and alternative to students who are not satisfied with the traditionalist and classical system of the
school by allowing them to develop their sense of revolt in a constructive way and thus appreciating literature and culture more
and not praising the conservative values of school such as olympiads and contests that are
typical of the competitive educational system. Alecart challenges the minds and opens the hearts of
teenagers who are willing to engage in honest discussions. The support that Alecart gets is really beneficial and I am
happy that important cultural figures from the fields of philology, politology and journalism want to trigger the passion for literature
amongst the youth and to drive forward this cultural phenomenon. In the end, Mrs. Munteanu places great
emphasis on the fact that revolt, which is specific to the youth that do not
want to be defined by the school system, is more generally at the foundation of any cultural revolution. The guiding figure is very important in this project. Those who are animated by the idea of bringing
about change and by setting literature at a higher level of perceiving reality are the roots of this cultural project.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *