Cultural Entrepreneurship

Cultural Entrepreneurship


Welcome! Let us spend couple minutes
trying to learn about the creative economy with special emphasis on understanding the place of creativity in economic development. For this, we will try to answer three main questions: First, what are some forms of creativity and how
does creativity come about. Second, how do we recognize creative
goods and services. And third, which frameworks to we have to understand the creative economy. Let us look at creativity first. Our curiosity to
understand why something is the way it is, leads to experimentation, problem solving
and validating of falsifying assumptions. This is scientific creativity. Whereas human creativity is that form where one imagines, dreams, creates world views and tends to be artistic. We see several examples of innovative forms of business models, new ways to create competitive advantage or put new technologies to commercial use. This is economic creativity. Of course, everything that undergird these forms of creativities is called technological creativity, often seen as technological breakthroughs such the making of the internet. Now, one may think that creativity happens when one is in the shower. It does. However, at the heart of it all, creativity is a social processes and often there is a spark, which happens in the shower when one connects various disparate pieces together. In either case, creativity is manifested at the
intersection of four forms of capitals – human capital that’s our education, job
training. Social capital through our networks, cultural capital with visible components such as the language we speak, how we dress, and rituals, and invisible components such as our belief systems, and institutional capital in the form of law
policies and so on. A social process is in play with these forms of capital and an output of the process is the many manifestations of creativity one being the goods and services. So what are some examples of creative
goods and services? Well, we see them as original words in literary works, music, or organizational work such as the making of movies or designing products, and community work in the form of public art and creative placemaking. What’s special is that in each case human creativity is at the core and the output is creative goods and services. These are different than normal utility oriented goods because often they possess intellectual property or create value for all – the creators, producers, distributors and consumers. Creative goods help us connect with our history, the place, the culture, and they demonstrate the property wherein the more we discuss, debate, present a point of view or consume, the more we start appreciating them. This is valorization, an important property of creative goods. If creative goods are special, then how
do we understand their contribution to the economy? There are many frameworks
which enable us to study the economic contribution. The DCMS, WIPO and Concentric Circles models are some examples. I will focus on United Nation’s Framework. UN classifies the creative industries into four main segments and nine sub-segments – cultural sites and expressions as the heritage industry, performing and visual arts as the arts industry segment print and audio-visual media as the media segment and finally design, creative services and new media as the functional services segment. As we can see this framework places equal emphasis on all types of creative goods. It also accommodates a wide range of industries. As a result it is a good model to conceptualize the role of creative industries in economic development in a way which also includes all segments of the society.

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